September 20, 2017

Full size, no crop.

No crop, this is right out of the camera.

This isn't cropped, we actually got within 5 feet of this least bittern, by turning off the motor and drifting up to the bird.
It is a fairly small bird at about 11 to 14 inches in length. For comparison an American robin is 9 to 11 inches.

It was out in the open on a weed mat and didn't pay any attention to us.

Ixobrychus exilis
Thanks to its habit of straddling reeds, the Least Bittern can feed in water that would be too deep for the wading strategy of other herons.
source - https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Least_Bittern/lifehistory

September 18, 2017

Lethal weapon

Great blue heron.
We were heading to the boat and notice this heron standing on the dock in front of us.
Since it was cooperating I took his picture.
That bill is a wicked looking weapon.

Ardea herodias
Great Blue Herons can hunt day and night thanks to a high percentage of rod-type photoreceptors in their eyes that improve their night vision.
source - https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Blue_Heron/lifehistory

September 17, 2017

Black-crowned night heron

Hip Deep.

An immature black crowned night heron up to its belly at the edge of the marsh.
It watched us for a while and then disappeared into the reeds.

Nycticorax nycticorax
A breeding Black-crowned Night-Heron will brood any chick that is placed in its nest. The herons apparently don’t distinguish between their own offspring and nestlings from other parents.
source - https://www.allaboutbirds.org/…/Black-crowned_N…/lifehistory

September 15, 2017

Belted kingfisher.

At the corner of the marina and the main channel are two old pilings.

Spotted this kingfisher monitoring the water nearby.
Just couldn't get close enough for a real close up, this photo is heavily cropped.
Megaceryle alcyon
Belted Kingfishers are stocky, large-headed birds with a shaggy crest on the top and back of the head and a straight, thick, pointed bill. Their legs are short and their tails are medium length and square-tipped.
source -
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/…/Belted_Kingfish…/lifehistory

September 13, 2017

An embarrassment of riches.

We don't often see ovenbirds and then usually just glimpses.
Today was different, we had one visit and perch in the open.

I have so many good photos I didn't know which one to pick.
This is one of the best ovenbird photos I took.

Seiurus aurocapilla
On its breeding ground, the Ovenbird divides up the forest environment with the other warblers of the forest floor. The Ovenbird uses the uplands and moderately sloped areas, the Worm-eating Warbler uses the steep slopes, and the Louisiana Waterthrush and the Kentucky Warbler use the low-lying areas.
source - https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ovenbird/lifehistory

September 11, 2017

Philadelphia vireo.


Another of the pond visitors, a Philadelphia Vireo.

Unlike most birds that come to our pond vireos do a splash and dash bath.
They sit in the bush above the pond, fly down, hit the water and go straight back up to the bush.

Vireo philadelphicus 
A bird of young deciduous woods, the Philadelphia Vireo is the most northernly breeding species of vireo. It is often overlooked because its more common relative, the Red-eyed Vireo lives in the same areas and gets most of the attention.
source - https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Philadelphia_Vireo/lifehistory

visitor

Northern waterthrush, Rondeau Provincial Park.
An unusual to the yard and pond.

This one stayed all day but was hard to see the majority of the time. They always seem to be behind a bush or clump of vegetation.


Parkesia noveboracensis
The Northern Waterthrush is territorial in both winter and summer. On the breeding grounds the male proclaims its territory with its loud, ringing song. On the wintering grounds it uses its "chink" calls, together with chasing and fighting, to keep out intruders.
source - https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Waterthrush/lifehistory

September 09, 2017

Canada warbler, eh.

First time in the yard this year, at least that we have seen.
Once again Anne spotted the bird moving through the top of the hedge.

Cardellina canadensis

A colorful, active warbler of northern forests, the Canada Warbler spends little time on its breeding grounds. It is one of the last warblers to arrive north in the spring, and one of the first to leave in the fall, heading early to its South American wintering grounds.
source -https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canada_Warbler/lifehistory